TALKS

Apart from offering the contents of our workshops as concise talks, we can provide information on the following topics:

The brain is not your friend. How to avoid systematic mistakes in decision making

Our minds are limited in a surprising number of ways. We are drawn to confirm our existing beliefs (instead of putting them to the test), prefer information which comes to our mind first, and see patterns where there are none. And would you belief that a simple roll of dice can influence the verdict of a judge?

 

Tendencies like these are called “cognitive biases”. And as much as they influence our thinking – we are normally not aware of them. Roughly two hundred of these mental mechanisms have been identified so far. Evolved for a life in stone age, they pose serious problems in this complex age of information.

 

In our talk, we will focus on biases and fallacies which interfere with decision making, like hyperbolic discounting, priming, overconfidence or the sunk-cost-fallacy. We’ll explain how these biases function, give plenty of examples and show how to work against them – to handle risk and uncertainty better and make more informed decisions.

How to be creative. Surprisingly simple ways to come up with more ideas

We are supposed to be creative – more often and in more fields than ever before. The digital turn, the attention economy and partly our own well-being – everything calls for improvisation and creativity. And to reliably succeed in producing something new we have to get organized: We need methods, virtues and hacks.

 

Also, most work involves more improvisation and creativity than we recognise. Unless we’re doing a job that only involves following a set of written-out instructions, odds are our job is going to require dealing with exceptions and problems that will demand some ingenuity.

 

Luckily – and as diverse as its products might be – the way creativity works and how creative people live boils down to a handful of principles and qualities. This talk reflects about these common traits, shows how to develop them ourselves and provides all the methods and hacks necessary to think around the corner and come up with new solutions.

The brain is not your friend. How to avoid systematic mistakes in decision making

Our minds are limited in a surprising number of ways. We are drawn to confirm our existing beliefs (instead of putting them to the test), prefer information which comes to our mind first, and see patterns where there are none. And would you belief that a simple roll of dice can influence the verdict of a judge?

 

Tendencies like these are called “cognitive biases”. And as much as they influence our thinking – we are normally not aware of them. Roughly two hundred of these mental mechanisms have been identified so far. Evolved for a life in stone age, they pose serious problems in this complex age of information.

 

In our talk, we will focus on biases and fallacies which interfere with decision making, like hyperbolic discounting, priming, overconfidence or the sunk-cost-fallacy. We’ll explain how these biases function, give plenty of examples and show how to work against them – to handle risk and uncertainty better and make more informed decisions.

How to be creative. Surprisingly simple ways to come up with more ideas

We are supposed to be creative – more often and in more fields than ever before. The digital turn, the attention economy and partly our own well-being – everything calls for improvisation and creativity. And to reliably succeed in producing something new we have to get organized: We need methods, virtues and hacks.

 

Also, most work involves more improvisation and creativity than we recognise. Unless we’re doing a job that only involves following a set of written-out instructions, odds are our job is going to require dealing with exceptions and problems that will demand some ingenuity.

 

Luckily – and as diverse as its products might be – the way creativity works and how creative people live boils down to a handful of principles and qualities. This talk reflects about these common traits, shows how to develop them ourselves and provides all the methods and hacks necessary to think around the corner and come up with new solutions.

Let’s discuss how we can work with you:

 

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